This third article in the “Surviving Alice” series[1] examines how the USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has responded to the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 2014 Alice decision[2].  It also shows how applicants can use the PTAB’s recent decisions to substantially increase their chances of success before the board.  We look at appeals coming out of the USPTO’s business method work groups 3620, 3680 and 3690. Applicants have had a difficult time getting business method patents allowed since Alice.  The Alice decision firmly established the two part “Alice/Mayo test” as the standard for determining whether a patent’s claims were statutory under 35 U.S.C. 101.  The two steps in the Alice/Mayo test are:

  1. “Determine whether the claims at issue are directed to a patent-ineligible concept” [3](e.g. abstract idea or fundamental economic practice); and
  2. If the claims are directed to a patent–ineligible concept then “search for an ‘inventive concept’-i.e., an element or combination of elements that is ‘sufficient to ensure that the patent in practice amounts to significantly more than a patent upon the [ineligible concept] itself. “[4] (e.g. an improvement to another technology)

The business method work groups[5] at the USPTO implemented the Alice/Mayo test right after the Alice decision.  Allowances in some work groups (e.g. 3690 finance) plunged by a factor of 10 within a month of the decision.  Even three years later, there is still over a 90% chance that an office action on a business method patent application will have a 101 rejection[6].  In response to these repeated § 101 rejections by the examiners, many applicants have appealed their rejections to the PTAB.  We are just now seeing these appeals being decided by the board, and overall the results have not been good for applicants.  Only about 20% of the 101 rejections are being reversed.  Nonetheless, we are gaining a significant and rapidly growing body of PTAB decisions which we can learn from.  These decisions[7] are discussed below. Continue Reading Surviving Alice with an Appeal

As has been well documented, the Supreme Court’s decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank has had a dramatic impact on the allowability of computer implemented inventions.  This second article in our series explores the dynamics of that impact on the e-commerce arts.  Our first article[1] showed that in the finance arts (e.g. banking and insurance) Alice had an immediate and substantial impact reducing allowances per month by a factor of 10.  A similar but more complicated impact was felt in e-commerce.  Allowances per month immediately dropped but then recovered only to drop again.  We will present an analysis of what is being allowed today as a guide to practitioners filing applications in this field.

Art Unit Organization by Subclasses

E-Commerce patents fall under the general category of business methods and are examined in work groups 3620 and 3680.  Table 1 below shows the technologies they encompass as well as the associated “old” US patent classifications[2] and the examining art units[3].  The old US patent classifications are referenced because they are still used to assign applications to art units.  The primary class of e-commerce and business method patents is class 705.  The “e-Commerce subclasses” in the table below is based on the majority subclasses being examined in each art unit.  The subclass designations generally account for at least 80% of the applications being examined in a given art unit.  Interestingly, a significant minority of applications in these art units are not classified as 705 applications.  According to conversations I’ve had with examiners, these are cases that were originally assigned to other work groups but were later referred into these work groups because the classifications done by the contractor were not correct.  Apparently even after reassignment into these work groups, the original class/subclass designations stayed in the PAIR records for the applications.

Continue Reading Surviving Alice in the e-Commerce Arts

The U.S. Supreme Court’s 2014 decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank (“Alice”)[i] has had a dramatic impact on the allowability of computer implemented inventions, especially in the finance arts (e.g. insurance, banking, etc.).  This series of articles explores the dynamics of that impact in different computer implemented arts as a useful guide to help patent practitioners navigate the new realities of post-Alice prosecution. In Technology Center 3600, art units 3691-3696 within Work Group 3690 examine applications in finance, banking and insurance (“Finance Art Units”).  These art units have been the most heavily impacted by Alice.

Fig. 1

Figure 1 shows the total number of allowances per month, abandons per month and appeals per month for patent applications examined in Work Group 3690, from January 2014 to March 2016.  The data is from the USPTO’s public PAIR[ii] system.  PatentAdvisor™[iii] was used to collect and process the data. There are currently about 80 examiners in this Work Group.  The Work Group produces about 8400 office actions on the merits per year (i.e. nonfinal rejections, final rejections and allowances).  Prior to Alice, about 2100 of the actions per year were allowances (25% of the total actions).  Post Alice, only 220 of the actions per year have been allowances (2.6% of the total actions). Continue Reading Surviving Alice in the Finance Arts